Category Archives: General

atb #80 | Killing Me Softly / Passive Bewaffnung

Claudia Reinhardt & Cornelia Herfurtner

exhibition: September 5 – October 4, 2020

Due to the current situation no opening will take place. We invite you to visit the exhibition in the presence of the artists. Email after-the-butcher to request your visit. Please wear a mouth and nose protection mask when entering the exhibition space:
September 4, 6-10 p.m., September 12, 19, 26 and October 3, 3-6 p.m.
September 19, 7 p.m. Book Release: Witwen/Widows, Claudia Reinhardt, The Green Box, 2020

Sunday October 4, Finissage 3-8 p.m. 3D film screening at 6 p.m. of Flipping the Stationary Car, 2018 by Cornelia Herfurtner, David Iselin-Ricketts, John Allan MacLean (45min). Visit only by prior appointment until latest Sunday October 4, 11 p.m. at: ina@after-the-butcher.de

Passive Bewaffnung (Passive armament)

Legally speaking, we currently commit an offense with every organized gathering of people. Thanks to Covid-19, Germany is now passively armed,  masks and protective screens concealing our faces, obligated to disguise. What happened? After 1968, protesters in 1970s Federal Republic of Germany increasingly began to use face masks in order to protect their personal rights – after all, taking to the streets risked recognition and subsequent dismissal from work or school. Ever since the passing of anti-terrorist legislation in 1977, masked protestors are not only deemed to expect, but to provoke violence. With the birth of ‘passive Bewaffnung’ came the prohibition of masked protests.  Following Brokdorf and the anti-nuclear movement, laws were tightened: Anyone wearing protective gear in anticipation of police violence was now considered passively armed. Meanwhile, ever since the GSG 9 unit, their counterpart’s appearance has grown to resemble military expeditions against their own citizens with each May 1st protest – or the G20 summit. Protestors, on the other hand, are called to avoid helmets, goggles, protective gloves, mouthguards – and to best leave their keys at home if they are on their way to a protest. At present, the issue of active self-protection against potential threats is delicate to say the least: Who wears masks for the benefit of or protection against whom? Who or what constitutes the adversary? Cornelia Herfurtner’s sculpted reliefs are still lifes of a history of the FRG about uprising and repressive state power – a history to be continued.

Killing Me Softly

“To be nowhere, to stay nowhere. Diving, resting, moving without effort of force – and one day reflecting, reappearing, walking through a clearing […]. Start with the beginning.” (I. Bachmann, Undine leaves)

Suicide is a form of violence, but also of freedom. Between 2000 and 2004, Claudia Reinhardt photographically re-staged ten suicides of well-known artists* – personalities who fascinated her and whose work and life influenced her in her work. As a kind of personal tribute, Reinhardt allows fiction and reality to merge into one another, researching for each photo both in literature and in the archives what exactly drove those women* to say goodbye to life. The motives and methods are very different: there is the planned and precisely executed suicide, for example in the case of Sylvia Plath or Anne Sexton, and there is the slow destruction of one’s own body, such as Ingeborg Bachmann’s addiction to pills and alcohol. Reinhardt chooses a thoroughly psychological approach to her role models by slipping into the role of the dying herself: she reenacts the ten deaths, the moment equipped in every detail and allows herself to be photographed. If that adjective were not in exact opposition to what is depicted here, the scenery could indeed be described as “alive” due to its filmic character. What caused these women* to oppose, to withdraw from life? Unfortunately, the possible reasons still seem to be present: patriarchal, physical violence, fascist systems, lack of equal rights and recognition of their works, to name but a few. Without wanting to glorify suicide, Reinhardt’s photographs therefore also capture a moment of greatest self-determination.

“But I can’t go like this. So let me say good things to you once again, so that you won’t get divorced like this. So that nothing gets divorced.” (ibid.)

Nadja Abt, Berlin, 2020

Claudia Reinhardt
(* 1964 in Viernheim/South Hesse) studied at the University of Fine Arts, (*1964 in Viernheim/South Hesse) studied at the University of Fine Arts Hamburg. From 2000–2012, she taught as a professor in the department of photography at the National Art Academie in Bergen, Norway. Reinhardt became known, among other things, through her photographic work Killing Me Softly – Todesarten (Aviva Verlag, Berlin 2004), a series of photographs dealing with female artists who killed themselves. Reinhardt stages theses suicides using herself as a model. The work No Place Like Home (Verbrecher Verlag, 2005) is about the meaning of origin and identity. The work Tomb of Love (Verbrecher Verlag, 2016) again deals with the topic of suicide, staging couples who their own lives together. The work Widows and Widows is about mourning and remembrance, a documentary and conceptual photographic work, which will be published by The Green Box, Berlin, in 2020. Exhibitions: Haus am Kleistpark, Berlin (2018); Kunstgeschichtliches Museum, Osnabrück (2017); Galerie Malopolski Ogród Sztuki, Cracow (2016); Galerie im Körnerpark, Berlin (2015); Corean Art Museum, Seoul (2015); Galerie F15, Moss, Norway (2015); Contemporary Art Museum, Roskilde (2015); Fotogalleriet Format, Malmö (2014); Meta House, Phnom Penh (2011); Kunsthalle Memmingen (2010); IDFX, Breda Photo Festival, Breda (2007); Micro Museum, Zurich (2009); Brooklyn Museum, New York (2004) and others.

Cornelia Herfurtner
(*May 8, 1987) is an artist and organized in the Interventionist Left. As part of the alliance Disarm Rheinmetall, she works against arms production, arms exports and Germany’s largest arms producer Rheinmetall. As an artist, she works under her civil name as well as with the artist group Michelle Volta and the publishing house and bookshop b_books. Her most recent projects include a series of photographs entitled freedom and control of others (including myself) (published in starship #19) and the collectively taught seminar Self-Organization and University (with Ernest Ah and Anastasio Mandel, Berlin University of the Arts). Her video essay Frauen verlassen das Museum (in collaboration with David Polzin) can be seen at the Mitte Museum in Berlin-Wedding until January 2021.

Funded by:

atb #79 | KAUE KAUE

Julia Oschatz & Sonja Hornung

exhibition: July 31 – August 30, 2020

Due to the current situation no opening will take place. We invite you to visit the exhibition in the presence of the artists:
July 31, 6-10 p.m. and August 2, 3-6 p.m.
Email after-the-butcher to request your visit. Please wear a mouth and nose protection mask when entering the exhibition space.

THEY WANTED TO MOVE / THEY FOUND THEY COULD NOT MOVE / OR RATHER THAT MOVEMENT WAS ONLY POSSIBLE IN / THE PREORDERED DIRECTION, THROUGH SPACES ALREADY SHAPED TO ACCOMMODATE THEIR MOVEMENT / AT THE REQUIRED SPEED, IN THE REQUIRED MANNER / SO, AND NOT SO; / HERE, AND NOT THERE, ETC. / SO IN FACT, THERE WAS NO REAL MOVEMENT, ONLY REPETITION, MAYBE SLIGHT VARIATION, WITHIN THE GIVEN STRUCTURE. / AND IN THAT SENSE, THERE WAS NO REAL MOVEMENT, ONLY REPETITION, MAYBE SLIGHT VARIATION, IN THE PRE-GIVEN STRUCTURE.

Julia Oschatz’s work Unter Tagen is a video installation developed for after the butcher thematising both the everyday influence of space on human movement and action, as well as the attempt to change this dynamic.

Sperre III is the third in Sonja Hornung’s series of works departing from Varvara Stepanova’s (1894-1958) search for a ‘uni-form’ that would erase the gendered division of labour. Each iteration of Sperre consists of a singular garment arising from a specific urban context or crisis, and texts compressed into aquarelle drawings. Sperre III thinks through financialisation and its ‘collateral’ effects on urban spaces and bodies gendered female.

Julia Oschatz was born in Darmstadt in 1970 and lives in Berlin and Sandau an der Elbe. Alongside numerous exhibitions of her videos, drawings, paintings and installations – most recently at Artbox Dresden, Kunstverein Hannover, and Berlin’s Kupferstichkabinett – she also makes set designs, currently for Hamlet at Maxim Gorki Theater, Berlin.

Sonja Hornung was born in Birrarunga/Melbourne in 1987 and lives since 2012 in Berlin. Her installations, drawings, and collaborations – for example with COPS (Corporation of People’s Situations) and Kollektiv x-embassy – have been shown at, among others, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, District Berlin, and Forum Stadtpark (Graz). Currently she is an Artist-in-Residence at Q21/MQ Vienna.

Funded by:

atb #78 | exemplarische kämpfe

Martin Haufe
Minze Tummescheit & Arne Hector (cinéma copains)

exhibition: May 29 – June 10, 2020

Due to the current situation no opening will take place. We invite you to visit the exhibition in the presence of the artists:
Sa June 6/ Su June 7 / Su June 14 / Fr June 19 / Su June 21, 3-6 p.m.
Email after-the-butcher to request your visit. Please wear a mouth and nose protection mask when entering the exhibition space.

Since 2014 Martin Haufe has been working intensively on the topic of “friendship”. Within friendships we learn to act “morally right”, at the same time capitalist living conditions influence the form of our relationships. In Martin Haufe’s ongoing research, questions about the relationship and potential of criticism and friendship therefore play a central role. His research has resulted in various textile works for the exhibition exemplarische Kämpfe (exemplary struggles).

The 6-part interview chain “in arbeit” (2008-2018) by Minze Tummescheit and Arne Hector (cinéma copains) is a cinematic investigation of the conditions, possibilities and limits of collective action. The communicative process of research becomes the content of the film. A number of collectives are brought into contact with each other by members of one group travelling together with cinéma copains and holding a conversation with the next collective together. The result is a chain of interviews that paints a picture of cooperative practice in various European countries. The exhibition exemplarische Kämpfe (exemplary struggles) shows excerpts from the series, which is 285 minutes long in total.

Martin Haufe
(*1986 Großröhrsdorf) studied media art at the HGB Leipzig, the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts and the MLU Halle (Saale) in the field of psychology. He received a scholarship from the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, and is currently a master student of Joachim Blank. Martin Haufe spent several working & research stays in Vietnam and was selected for a KdFS scholarship in 2019. In addition to his practice as a solo artist, he is involved in various commemorative cultural projects and is active as an artistic creator.

cinéma copains
Since 2000 Arne Hector and Minze Tummescheit have been working as cinéma copains in cooperation with copines and copains from all over the world. They are interested in economic topics, which they always understand as political and social issues. Their documentary work, which includes lectures, performances, installations and artistic documentaries, is based on long-term projects. At the interface between documentary film and art, with a visible political stance, they seek form for content.

Funded by:

atb #77 | Pourparler

Ines Lechleitner, Hans-Jörg Mayer

Exhibition extended: March 7 – May 17, 2020

She is someone who ferments fruit and vegetables, photographs and records them on video. He is someone who draws and paints and moulds.
She finds scenery and landscapes. He white canvas and blue beans. She depicts “Body Gestures” and strong women. He a woman-fox creature or statements like “Life is life” or “Everything has to be done by oneself”.
She goes to the heart of the matter and captures the rushing river Rhine in a “River Glass”. He brings a spinning disco ball to a halt with a brush. She applies “Scales” onto paper-maché. He rabbits on velvet. She explores the “Boundaries Of Music”. He tinkers at the edges of art history.
She works site-specifically. He hardly ever does.
And then they meet. And talk. And they decide to do something together. Pourparler.
And while they talk about lemons and onions and plums, something comes between them. It starts to hiss and there it is: the in-between, the inter-personal, and it chirps about in-between spaces. In nuances. And they both become curious.
For her it’s as if she’s picking out ingredients at the market. There are his next to hers, and she takes them boldly. Intuitively. He collects hectically. And prepares everything with care. To after the butcher they carry their ingredients. Without a recipe.
It remains a game, and on the surface, as they roll the dice, divide everything into cubes and mix it up in the old butcher’s shop. The work of the other becomes their own. And parts of it form a new whole. Tensely they lie in wait and observe. They let the ingredients do their job. Without questioning what is going on.
But you can talk about it. Pourparler. Talking in suspense.
She is Ines Lechleitner and he is Hans-Jörg Mayer.
Their joint exhibition runs from 7 March to May 2020.
Text by Nele Meissner

Ines Lechleitner (*1978 in Vienna) lives in Berlin. As an interdisciplinary working artist, photographer and cook, Ines Lechleitner combines media such as photography, drawing, sculpture, sound, film, cooking and scent in her installations, performances and artist books. She researches non-verbal communication and creates situations of dialogue with artists and scientists. She was a researcher at the Jan Van Eyck Academie in Maastricht, studied at the Ecole Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, the NSCAD College for Art and Design in Halifax, and the San Francisco Art Institute. www.ineslechleitner.com

Hans-Jörg Mayer (* 1955 in Singen) lives in Berlin. Hans-Jörg Mayer is represented by the galleries Nagel Draxler, Berlin / Cologne, Christine Mayer, Munich, Gabi Senn Gallery, Vienna, Samuelis Baumgarte, Bielefeld, and M. LeBlanc, Chicago. Works are owned by the Museum Ludwig in Cologne and the mumok in Vienna, the Grässlin Collection in St. Georgen, the Brandhorst Collection in Munich, the Pat and Juan Vergez Collection in Buenos Aires, among others.

Funded by:

atb #76 | Stoff

Judith Raum, Ulu Braun
Finissage & artist talk:
Sunday December 8, from 5 to 8 p.m.

Historical Drawing
A conversation between Judith Raum and Ines Schaber.
In artistic research processes and when working with archive material, questions repeatedly arise about the approach to or demarcation from scientific working methods and about the artistic form of processing, whereby the relationship between attention to detail and fictionalization is only one of the scales on which we have to position ourselves.
As an artist, Judith Raum spent several years researching the textile workshop of the Bauhaus and developed lecture performances and installations from it, such as the work Gittertülle shown in after the butcher, which deals with the curtain fabrics designed at the Bauhaus in 1933, the last year of the institution and the beginning of National Socialist rule.
In after the butcher, Ines Schaber (artist and author, Berlin/Los Angeles) and Judith Raum continue a conversation that they have been conducting for some time about the artistic examination of historical material and the resulting tension between documentation, narration, and abstraction.

The conversation begins at 6 p.m.
With “Glühwein” & biscuits…

Judith Raum, Ulu Braun
Opening Friday, October 18, 2019 at 7pm
Exhibition October 19 – December 8, 2019

In the spring of 1933, shortly before its closure, the Bauhaus Berlin launched a final collection of woven curtain fabrics. The designers Lilly Reich and Otti Berger had supervised the development of the collection. Judith Raum’s installation Gittertüll places one type of fabric from the collection at the centre of attention: highly light-permeable window nets, so-called lattice grommets, manufactured in many places in the German Reich at the time, now extinct here. Otti Berger and Lilly Reich pursued quite different agendas with their creative work, and their collaboration was therefore conflictual. In the years following the Bauhaus, the lattice grommets continued to live on in the work of both designers in different ways. The video work within the installation explores the question of how and whether Reich’s and Berger’s different interpretations of window nets can be brought together with their political stance in Nazi Germany.

The video collage Cave TV by Ulu Braun is a video installation that shows a projection on a relief-like surface. The installation reconstructs a social situation comparable to a campfire or a television set. The collaged images of the video refer to genres, epochs and styles of media history. Media fragments reverberate and meander on the video sculpture and hypnotize their audience with lively, flowing projections and forms. An archaic ritual that questions the (earth) attraction of light and darkness. “It is like a primal campfire that draws the viewer into contemplation on existence within his medial representation.” (David L.)

Judith Raum (1977, Germany), studied fine art at the Städelschule in Frankfurt/M. and the Cooper Union NYC as well as philosophy, psychoanalysis and art history at the Goethe-University Frankfurt/M. Her installations and performances combine material-based processes and traditional artistic media such as painting, drawing and object with thematic fields, mostly researched in archives, from economic and social history. In addition to German economic colonialism in the Ottoman Empire, the textile medium and its historical interdependencies, the procedures inherent in it, and its specific materiality have often been the subject of her work in recent years. Since 2016, she has been researching the materials used in the textile workshop at the Bauhaus.

Ulu Braun (1976, Germany) lives and works in Berlin. Between 1996 and 2005 he studied painting and experimental film at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna, the University of the Arts Helsinki and the Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf in Potsdam. Since 1997 he has been using video as a medium to explore the field between visual art and auteur cinema. He plays a key role in the genre of video collage and the transfer from painting to video.

judithraum.net
ulubraun.com

atb #75 | The Yellow Section

Maja Weyermann, Birgit Auf der Lauer & Caspar Pauli, Evrim Kavcar

Maja Weyermann, untitled (Sketch for the project „Uzaktan Mektuplar – Letters from Abroad“)
around 2014, inheritance Maja Weyermann © Maja Weyermann, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Maja Weyermann
Birgit Auf der Lauer & Caspar Pauli
Evrim Kavcar

Opening Friday, June 21, 2019 at 7 pm
Trembling is the Curtain, Shaken the Screen
Birgit Auf der Lauer & Caspar Pauli, Performance

Exhibition June 22 – September 14, 2019
Closing event September 14, 2019, from 3 pm
Diskussion: The Artist Maja Weyermann at 6 pm
with Kathrin Becker and Erden Kosova, moderation: Antje Weitzel,
Performance at 9 pm: Birgit Auf der Lauer & Caspar Pauli

open by Appointment +49 30 1783298106 or ina@after-the-butcher.de

majaweyermann.org
varsityofmaneuvers.org
evrimkavcar.com

atb #74 | i am Ellen

Lena Elise-Aicher, Pharaz Azimi, Göksu Baysal, Ruben Bygravaa, Lars Christiansen, Hannah Sophie Dunkelberg, Marta Dyachenko, Pauline Gabert, Katharina-Sophie Heck, Alexander Hörl, Hans Jurisch, Wendelin Kammermeier, Emma Brunet, Solon Krieger, Carlotta Lücke, Antonia Nannt, Julius Palm, Kim Schönauer, Batoul Sedawi, Steven Thelen, Daniel Topka

Classe Pernice – i am Ellen

Opening Friday, May 3, 2019 at 7 pm
Exhibition May 4 – June 8, 2019

Closing event Saturday Juni 8, 2019, at 12 pm

enaeliseaicher.com
goksubaysal.com
hannahsophiedunkelberg.com
larschristensen.net
wendelinkammermeier.com

atb #71 | Entanglements

Michaela Meise, Tomás Saraceno, Forensic Architecture & Die Gesellschaft der Freund*innen von Halit & Initiative 6. April

Exhibition September 29 – November 11, 2018

Opening Friday, September 28, 2018 at 7 pm

Discussion Event: Thursday, October 4, 2018, 7 pm
By clients* and researchers: Art vs. right-wing terror With Ayşe Güleç (Die Gesellschaft der Freundinnen von Halit, Kassel), Fritz Lazlo Weber (artist, Kassel) and Dieter Lesage (philosopher, Royal Institute for Theatre, Cinema and Sound, Brussels), moderated by Nora Sternfeld (documenta professor, Kunsthochschule Kassel).

On the opening weekend of Berlin Art Week:
Saturday, November 29, Sunday 30, 12-6 pm

pressrelease.pdf

In Entanglements / Verstrickungen, after the butcher presents three artistic positions that deal with issues that were already a concern of historical modernism in confronting capitalism. How can art engage in society? Can it implement pioneering new ideas that change the current situation in a positive way?In this spirit, the unique work 77sqm_9:26minby Forensic Architecture is directly addressing a legal suit and a political debate. Gesellschaft der Freund*innen von Halit, an international group of artistsand activists, commissioned the research group from London to investigate the involvement of the Hessian secret service agent Andreas Temme in the Kassel NSUmurder of Halit Yozgat. In a detailed simulation, the research group refutes the statements of the secret service agent who was present at the scene of the crime, when the murder happened in a Kassel Internet café.The sculptor Michaela Meise presents her work Der Ort, Station Zfrom 2007 for the first time in Berlin. Station Z was a camouflaged site of execution within the NS concentration camp of Sachsenhausen, north of Berlin. Meise focuses in her work on the concentration camp memorial architecture of this charged location. In an artist’s book, she reflects on the various contexts of memorials in East and West Germany andtheir divergent architectural solutions and implementations. Tomás Saraceno presents spider/webs weaving their filigreed webs. For the exhibition Entanglements, the artist will experiment with a radio antenna that feeds an alternative open source wireless community network with live broadcasts of sounds coming from a colony of social and solitary spiders. While working on their webs their urgent vibrations can be understood as emergent rhythmstowards a world of interspecies solidarity.

The exhibition will take place in collaboration with Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) as part of the exhibition project A 37 90 89 –Die Erfindung der Neo-Avantgarde (The Invention of the Neo-Avantgarde)on the project space of the same name in Antwerp fifty years ago. It will take place in the framework of Berlin Art Week and is funded by Hauptstadtkulturfonds.

Forensic Architecture is an independent research collective at Goldsmiths, University of London. The group was commissioned by the Society of Friends of Halitand the April 6th Initiative to investigate the killing of Halit Yozgat by the rightwing NSU terrorist group. The work was coproduced by documenta 14. Also on display is a video (camera: SefaDefterli) of the demonstration “No Tenth Victim” on May 6, 2006, which was organized by friends and supporters of the Yozgat family from the local April 6th Initiativein Kassel.

Michaela Meise (* 1976) lives in Berlin. The media she uses range from drawing and sculpture to performance and music, and she also arranges pictures and texts and integrates them into collage-like installations. She is represented by the King Gallery.

Tomás Saraceno (* 1973) is an Argentine artist living in Berlin. His artistic work often connects science, architecture and society. He examines different social systems and networks in which the human being moves. He is represented by the Gallery Esther Schipper.

michaelameise.de
studiotomassaraceno.org